h i d d e n l i n e

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jutlandsouth:

Dieter RothMotorradrennfahrer III, 1970 (reconstructed in 1994)

jutlandsouth:

Dieter Roth
Motorradrennfahrer III, 1970 (reconstructed in 1994)

— 15 hours ago with 2 notes

alina-chan:

Dieter Roth / Björn Roth: Gartenskulptur, 1968

— 15 hours ago with 7 notes
joereorda:

Installation view
‘Dieter Roth – Selbste’
Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland, 2011

joereorda:

Installation view
‘Dieter Roth – Selbste’
Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, Switzerland, 2011

— 15 hours ago with 2 notes
red-lipstick:

Philip Taaffe (b. 1955, Elizabeth, New Jersey) - Overtone, 1983   Linoprint Collage, Acrylics on Paper on Canvas

red-lipstick:

Philip Taaffe (b. 1955, Elizabeth, New Jersey) - Overtone, 1983   Linoprint Collage, Acrylics on Paper on Canvas

(Source: philiptaaffe.info, via vjeranski)

— 18 hours ago with 1017 notes
blastedheath:

Marcello Morandini (Italian, b. 1940), Composizione n°77,  1971. Acrylic on shaped wood,  30 x 30 x 7.5 cm.

blastedheath:

Marcello Morandini (Italian, b. 1940), Composizione n°77,  1971. Acrylic on shaped wood,  30 x 30 x 7.5 cm.

— 21 hours ago with 59 notes
megaestructuras:

Kiyonori Kikutake | Marine City | 1963
Future City @ The Barbican, un álbum de mr prudence en Flickr.

megaestructuras:

Kiyonori Kikutake | Marine City | 1963

Future City @ The Barbican, un álbum de mr prudence en Flickr.

— 1 day ago with 25 notes
truneet:

Jason Dodge - A rain pipe that is connected to the gutter on the roof so that when it rains, the rain is diverted into the gallery, 2014

truneet:

Jason Dodge - A rain pipe that is connected to the gutter on the roof so that when it rains, the rain is diverted into the gallery, 2014

(via adjutor)

— 1 day ago with 110 notes
robertotres:

Roberto Tres   Mental range in Flux portion # 11 # 8 — 2005 / 1999 Stone, Wood – installation 320 x 200 x 82 cm / / 125.9 x 78.7 x 32.2 inches

robertotres:

Roberto Tres   Mental range in Flux portion # 11 # 8 — 2005 / 1999 Stone, Wood – installation 320 x 200 x 82 cm / / 125.9 x 78.7 x 32.2 inches

(via lafilleblanc)

— 1 day ago with 45 notes
cinoh:


Sheila Hicks is one of the most important textile artists of the 20th century. She trained as a painter under Josef Albers at Yale’s School of Art and Architecture, and upon his recommendation applied for a Fulbright scholarship to study in Chile, commencing her lifelong commitment to textiles. Papillon (1997-2004), like others in her Miniatures series, was created on a small loom constructed from painter’s stretcher bars, making a practical and portable companion throughout her travels to a myriad of international locales.
Aptly named Papillon, which translates to “butterfly” from French, the textile is reminiscent of delicate, paper-thin butterfly wings. Hicks uses bookbinder’s paste to stiffen tripled floating warps of earthy colors like brown, orange and yellow. Thin sheets of dye transfer paper in chartreuse and ochre hues are crushed and woven between the warps. They are secured in place with small running stitches. Inspired by perhaps one of the most beautiful and elusive creatures in the natural world – the ephemeral butterfly – Hicks endeavors to explore the capabilities and characteristics of organic forms through materials, color and technique.
Jacqueline Sullivan is studying the History of Decorative Arts & Design at Cooper-Hewitt / Parsons. She is a Master’s Fellow in the Textile Department. 

cinoh:

Sheila Hicks is one of the most important textile artists of the 20th century. She trained as a painter under Josef Albers at Yale’s School of Art and Architecture, and upon his recommendation applied for a Fulbright scholarship to study in Chile, commencing her lifelong commitment to textiles. Papillon (1997-2004), like others in her Miniatures series, was created on a small loom constructed from painter’s stretcher bars, making a practical and portable companion throughout her travels to a myriad of international locales.

Aptly named Papillon, which translates to “butterfly” from French, the textile is reminiscent of delicate, paper-thin butterfly wings. Hicks uses bookbinder’s paste to stiffen tripled floating warps of earthy colors like brown, orange and yellow. Thin sheets of dye transfer paper in chartreuse and ochre hues are crushed and woven between the warps. They are secured in place with small running stitches. Inspired by perhaps one of the most beautiful and elusive creatures in the natural world – the ephemeral butterfly – Hicks endeavors to explore the capabilities and characteristics of organic forms through materials, color and technique.

Jacqueline Sullivan is studying the History of Decorative Arts & Design at Cooper-Hewitt / Parsons. She is a Master’s Fellow in the Textile Department. 

— 1 day ago with 29 notes
catherine-white:

Tea bowl

In the early seventeenth century, this powerful little sculpture in the guise of a tea bowl was made at the Motoyashiki kiln, in former Mino province. The bowl is shaped, glazed, and decorated in the format now called Black Oribe, one of numerous varieties invented by the potters working at Motoyashiki. The Black Oribe style at its most elaborate, as on this bowl, combines lustrous black glaze incised with graphic motifs and unrelated patterns loosely brushed over velvety white Mino clay and coated locally with translucent Shino glaze. All this, cradled in the hands, would frame a freshly whisked froth of chartreuse-green powdered tea, in an experience that engaged sight, touch, and taste. 

Tea bowl
Japan, Gifu prefecture, Toki city, Kujiri, Motoyashiki kiln
Momoyama period, ca. 1607–15
Mino ware, Black Oribe type
Stoneware with black glaze and iron pigment under clear glaze
Purchase—Harold P. Stern Memorial Fund, Freer trust fund, and Friends of the Freer and Sackler Galleries
F2014.5a–p

catherine-white:

Tea bowl

In the early seventeenth century, this powerful little sculpture in the guise of a tea bowl was made at the Motoyashiki kiln, in former Mino province. The bowl is shaped, glazed, and decorated in the format now called Black Oribe, one of numerous varieties invented by the potters working at Motoyashiki. The Black Oribe style at its most elaborate, as on this bowl, combines lustrous black glaze incised with graphic motifs and unrelated patterns loosely brushed over velvety white Mino clay and coated locally with translucent Shino glaze. All this, cradled in the hands, would frame a freshly whisked froth of chartreuse-green powdered tea, in an experience that engaged sight, touch, and taste.

Tea bowl
Japan, Gifu prefecture, Toki city, Kujiri, Motoyashiki kiln
Momoyama period, ca. 1607–15
Mino ware, Black Oribe type
Stoneware with black glaze and iron pigment under clear glaze
Purchase—Harold P. Stern Memorial Fund, Freer trust fund, and Friends of the Freer and Sackler Galleries
F2014.5a–p

— 1 day ago with 30 notes